Baking, cooking, grilling-BD Recipe Corner

I bet there is not one of you who doesn’t like to eat…and some of you are great cooks I’m sure. I personally love to cook. It’s my favorite reprieve from real life. I can spend hours in my kitchen baking, cooking, and putting a bit of love into all my dishes. So, I thought I’d start this topic so you all could share with me some of your favorite foods to make, and I’ll share some of mine with you!

Southern Pecan Pie

pecan pie (2)

1 cup granulated sugar
3 eggs
1/2 cup white corn syrup
1/2 cup evaporated milk
1 tablespoon vanilla
1 1/4 cup pecan halves
In mixer bowl, slightly beat eggs and sugar, corn syrup, evaporated milk and vanilla. Blend well. Add pecans and pour into unbaked 9" pie shell. Bake in 400 degree Farenheit oven for 10 minutes. Reduce heat to 350 degree Farenheit and bake an additional 30 to 40 minutes or until filling is puffed in center and is well browned. Cool before cutting.

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I’ll add more home cooked recipes later, but this is my go too after a long week at work.

After a long week dinner

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pecan pie is one of the things i miss living up north now

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8lbs boston butt.
1/8 cup chili powder
1/8 cup ground cumin
1/8 cup dried oregano
1/8 cup salt of choice(recommend Himalayan)
1/8 cup black pepper
4 fresh limes juiced
3 oranges juiced
2 onions quartered
1/8 cup freshly chopped garlic.

Mix all the spices together and then heavily cover pork. Places 1 onion in the bottom of your slow cooker, boston butt ontop. 2nd onion around the pork and pour your juices in. Cook on low for 8-10 hours. Check pork for doneness, should pull apart easily with a fork. Shred in slow cooker and let cook for 30 min on high. Remove pork from cooker, place on baking tray and Broil at 500f for 4 min.

Serve on corn tortillas with cilantro and onions.

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do you also miss good grits and good biscuits? i miss those for sure :stuck_out_tongue:

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Just FYI, Himalayan pink salt vs sea salt of any kind vs table salt has no real change on flavor. The difference comes from the presentation or the ability to create a crust. Himalayan and Sea salt both naturally have bigger grains and this must be considered when creating a crust or for curing meats. Himalayan pink salt is also good for presentation.

However, normal table salt is much cheaper and will have no change at all to the flavor profile at all.

“Doneness” for pork at minimum 145 degrees Fahrenheit.

Other than that this recipe is pretty solid and simple to do. :slight_smile:

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Pasta Carbonara

Per person:
Enough spaghetti
A pinch of salt
150grams of bacon
1 egg
0,75 liter of cream
3-4 slices of hard cheese (or if you’re cheap like me, 4 slices of regular cheese)

Optional:
Onion
Corn

Instructions:
Start boiling the water for the pasta, add a pinch of salt. start heating the frying pan while you chop up the bacon. Once the water starts boiling, add your spaghetti and start frying the bacon. If you’re using onion, add it in after 2 minutes.

Mix the yoke of the egg with the cream to a nice blend. As the bacon closes to finished you can throw in the corn if you want, if not, just throw out the water from the spaghetti, and add the egg/cream sauce. Tear the pieces of cheese up and add it to the mix, stirring the pot once in a while so it gets nice and mixed. Once all the cheese is added, add in the bacon.

Make sure to mix it well, then let it rest for 2-3 minutes so it can thicken. Then add salt/pepper to your liking.

Trying to write this out as made me realize that I’ve been watching to few cooking shows, and the Norwegian school system doesn’t tell you how to describe how to make food in English.

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Himalayan salt, i have found, is a better solvent.Just personal experience.

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This is giving me flashbacks of my 3am quesadilla’s with rum from that F2 when I met you like 5-6 years ago

My recipe from Saturday’s dinner: DelMarVa Peninsula style Crabcakes

  • 1 pound jumbo lump crab meat, picked over for shells
  • 20 saltine crackers
  • 1/2 cup Mayo
  • 1 egg
  • 1 tablespoon dijon mustard
  • 1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce
  • Copious amounts Old Bay seasoning, I don’t believe in measuring so I go by smell (~ 1 tablespoon also probably’ish)
  • 1/2 tablespoon Texas Pete hot sauce (yes specifically this one, need something slightly vinegry for the tang)

Crush crackers into a semi-fine powder/crumbs, coat crab meat with crackers in a bowl and set aside. Whisk together egg, mayo, mustard, sauces, spices in a separate bowl until smooth. GENTLY fold the wets into the crab & crackers being careful to keep the crab in large chunks; chill in the fridge for at least 1 hour before forming into your patties and cooking.

You can pan-fry them fine, but I deep-fry in a cast-iron skillet with an inch of vegetable oil (I don’t like the “white band” in the center of a pan-fried crabcake and think it looks unappealing). Cook for ~3-4 minutes a side until deep golden brown, remove to a wire wrack and dab off excess oil w/ paper towel. Serve with a simple cocktail sauce of 1 part ketchup, 1 part horseradish, and 1/4 part lemon juice (cocktail sauces should be borderline pink due to the horseradish, I’ll fight and die over that stance).

Saltines > breadcrumbs for crab-cakes. Once again, yes I will fight over that stance. Also don’t dredge your cakes before cooking, the crab is the star not the cake filler.

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Lol You drank a lot that era huh? And we still won. I am definitely trying the crab cakes.

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One of the strangest ~6 months of my life in retrospect; hardest classes I took, was doing undergrad research, and getting shit-faced almost every single day while still winning in BD. Somehow got a 4.0 that semester as an alcoholic and I am not a 4.0 student (or an alcoholic anymore).

I do not do the bacon quesadillas anymore. Oh god, that’d just kill my stomach for a day xD

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idk what size grains you talking about but just one grain is 8"x6"x2"

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for recipes pm me
:yum:

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I am drooling! Those all look so good!

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Anyone want to have a heart attack and die, i introduce you to the bacon explosion (requires smoker).
image

2 pounds bacon
1 pound sausage
1 cup bbq sauce (or however much you want really)
Extras
rolls
eggs
shit ton more bbq sauce

Basket weave 10 bacon strips together (should be about half your bacon). Cover basket weave bacon in layer of bbq sauce. Cook the other half of bacon in a frying pan until crisp. Take sausage and spread across the basket weave evenly. Take crisp bacon and crumble it on top of the sausage. Put more bbq sauce on top to taste.

Roll sausage into a tight compact log and pinch seams together. Then roll back with basket weave bacon and make sure seam of basket weave faces down (so log is on top of seam). Cover in more bbq sauce to taste (let’s be honest, this is already so unhealthy, so I’m not trying to tell you to limit the sauce). Your log should be about 2-3 inches thick.

Put in smoker for about 1 hour per inch of thickness. So 2-3 hours respectively. If you want to be exact, inside meat should be 165 degrees (for those with fancy tools). After finishes cooking, that’s right, put more bbq sauce on it.

For the last bit, I just prefer to eat it this way. Potato roll, about 1/2 inch slice of bacon explosion (you can do thicker… but you might feel your heart pumping for a while if you do), 1 fried egg, 1 slice of cheese of your preference (i usually do provolone), more bbq sauce if you want it.

You can also obviously add dry rubs and little extra’s in the initial steps if you prefer.

Enjoy your heart attack on a bun!

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Smoked Pork Ribs

Seafood Soup, fusion between Vietnamese and Italian cooking.

Bengali-style Curry

I cook a lot, pm for recipes.

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Ingredients: 1 egg, 1 wafel cone

recipe: fry egg, eat egg, eat wafel cone

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Now that looks like a BD satisfying on the go meal if I’ve ever seen one. lol

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wait till tonight for ur first indian dish pic

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Still waiting :sleeping:

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